UWAGA KANDYDACI NA STUDIA!

Zachęcamy wszystkich kandydatów na studia na specjalności prowadzone przez Instytut Kultur i Literatur Anglojęzycznych do zapoznania się z informacjami dotyczącymi rekrutacji na nasze studia. Rekrutacja na specjalności kierunku filologia angielska prowadzone przez IKiLA prowadzona jest drogą elektroniczną na takich samych zasadach jak na inne kierunki i specjalności oferowane przez Uniwersytet Śląski. Szczegółowe informacje na temat procesu rekrutacji można znaleźć na stronach Uniwersytetu Śląskiego.

The Writing Centre of the English Institutes at the University of Silesia in Katowice

We are happy to announce that the Writing Centre of the Institute of English Cultures and Literatures has resumed its work in the year 2016/2017. The Writing Centre offers help to students requiring assistance with written assignments or seeking to improve their academic and creative writing skills. For more information go to the Writing Centre website (http://writingcentre.us.edu.pl/).

Events
Announcements for Students
  • Propozycje modułów tematycznych dla obecnego II roku (studiów I stopnia) specjalności kmt i kaoj planowanych w przyszłym roku akademickim (2018/19)

     

    Moduły do wyboru 2018/2019

     

    Studia stacjonarne I stopnia

     

     

     

    PROSZĘ WYBRAĆ 1 MODUL Z OBSZARU LITERATURA/KULTURA ORAZ 1 MODUŁ Z OBSZARU MEDIA

     

    1.) 3 rok specjalność kultura-media-translacja: „LITERATURA/KULTURA” 15 godzin wykłady, 30 godzin ćwiczenia

     

    • Dr Marcin Mazurek Utopia i dystopia w literaturze, filmie i teorii -Utopia and Dystopia in Literature, Film and Theory

     

    The module’s purpose is to analyse selected examples of both literary and cinematic utopias and dystopias in view of their conceptual assumptions and – in case of utopias – their failures resulting in blurring the boundary between utopian ideals and dystopian, or anti-utopian outcomes. The texts and films under scrutiny include both classic literary representations and contemporary visions, which are all located within relevant theoretical contexts, including dystopian undertones in particular theoretical approaches.

     

     

     

    • dr hab.Eugenia Sojka

     

     

     

    (DE)CONSTRUCTING CANADIANNESS. REVISITING MYTHOLOGIES OF CANADA

     

     

     

    (DE)KONSTRUOWANIE KANADYJSKOŚCI. PONOWNE ODCZYTANIE MITOLOGII KANADY

     

     

     

    This interdisciplinary course is designed to explore literary and cultural texts ( including film and visual arts) of several minority groups in Canada with reference to changing mythologies of Canadianness. It focuses on dominant Canadian narratives of nationhood and their distinctiveness within the North American model.

     

     

     

    • dr hab. Eugenia Sojka

     

    CANADIAN INTERCULTURAL DRAMA, THEATRE AND PERFORMANCE  

     

    The course is designed to acquaint students with Canadian diasporic and Indigenous intercultural drama, theatre and performance and provide critical tools for the analysis of various types of interculturality. Texts selected for discussion will be grouped into the following categories: re-appropriation of canonical works, celebration of transculturality, dialogue of aesthetic traditions and performing intercultural memory

     

     

     

             2.) 3 rok specjalność kultura-media-translacja: „ MEDIA” 15 godzin wykłady, 30 godzin ćwiczenia

     

    • THE REVIVAL OF THE WEIRD IN CONTEMPORARY CULTURE

     

    Dr Karolina Lebek

     

     

     

    The course is devoted to the exploration of the phenomenon of the aesthetic form of the weird in contemporary literature, film, and TV of the fantastic and speculative inclination. Defined by the presence of things strange, unknown, disturbing and suggestive of monstrosity, the weird is a flexible and liquid form, accommodating instances of cosmic horror, the supernatural, the grotesque and the absurd. Therefore, the course maps the weird in the context of such genres and modes as horror, fantasy, the gothic and science fiction, tracing its roots to the late 19th century/ early 20th century in the short stories of such writers as Algernon Blackwood, M.P. Shiel, Ambrose Bierce, Robert Chambers, Arthur Machen, William Hope Hodgeson and, most significantly, H.P. Lovecraft. Moving on to contemporary culture, the course discusses selected weird works and theories of the weird offered by, among others, Thomas Ligotti, Jeff VanderMeer, China Mieville Michael Cisco, Kathe Koja, Caitlin Kiernan, Kelly Link as well as films, art and TV series inspired by their work. The assigned texts for the course will consist mostly of short stories and visual materials.

     

     

     

    • dr hab. Eugenia Sojka

     

     

     

    DECOLONIZING NORTH AMERICAN FILMMAKING: INDIGENOUS CINEMATIC SELF-REPRESENTATION IN CANADA

     

     

     

    The course is devoted to the postcolonial / decolonial analysis of cinematic discourses by selected Canadian filmmakers of Indigenous background. The first part of the course focuses on the examination of various types of colonial mis/representation of Aboriginal people in the mainstream American photography and film, and then it proceeds to the exploration of self-representation by Indigenous artists in films which aim at decolonizing the traditional ethnographic, Hollywood and other problematic representations of American Aboriginal people.

     

    • Course Title: THEORY OF GAMES, PLAY, AND CARNIVAL/ Teoria gier, zabawy i karnawału

     

    Instructor: mgr Ewa Wylężek

     

    Class Description: The module introduces the fundamental concepts of game and play theory as well as an examination of the concept of carnival and the relations between them. Students will learn about the differences and similarities between the phenomena as well as study the characteristics and tools games, play, and carnival include and use. The course will consider the social and cultural significance of ludicity and the emergence of homo ludens. Philosophical theories of play and games should be examined with special attention drawn to aspects such as, fate/chance, power, identity, carnivalesque, magic circle, alea, agon, mimicry, vertigo.

     

    The seminar portion of this course will build upon the ideas explored in lecture, albeit with an eye towards case studies inspired by computer games and other texts of culture. The written assignment will have as its aim an analysis of a chosen cultural phenomenon.

     

    • Course Title: A Survey of North American Cinema / Kino Pólnocnoamerykańskie

     

    Instructor: mgr Ewa Wylężek

     

     

     

    Class Description: This two-part course will address the development of North American cinema, specifically by positioning it as a unique site of expression, debate, inclusion/exclusion, consensus, and, of course, cultural negotiation.

     

     

     

    The lecture portion of this course will investigate North America’s cinematic history, specifically by relating it to notions of power, technology, identity, and nationhood. We will subsequently ponder how one hundred and twenty years of North American cinema, in the sense of production, transmission, and consumption, has played a unique role in the continuous formation, reception, and negotiation of those notions. Specific cinematic examples that we will contextually investigate include The Kid, The Phantom of the Opera, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Double Indemnity, On The Waterfront, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Graduate, Jaws, Back to the Future, Boyz n the Hood, American Beauty, and WALL-E. By the conclusion of this course students ought to be able to demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of North American culture via the lens of cinema. Students should equally be able to identify and expound upon the social movements, technological developments, governmental influence, and capitalist motivations that have played a role in establishing this cinematic history.

     

     

     

    The seminar portion of this course will build upon the ideas explored in lecture, albeit with an eye towards cinematic adaptions of classic North American novels and plays. Our seminar time will be dedicated to theories of adaptation, the major differences between cinema and literary texts, strategies for altering literary texts for the cinematic medium, factors that influence the adaptation process, and why specific texts have been optioned for cinematic development.

     

     

     

     

     

    • Dr hab. Leszek Drong Irish Film and Literature

     

    (20th century)

     

     

     

    This course offering interweaves films and readings in order to vary the range of cutural texts concerned with Irish history and social issues which have informed and inspired Irish artists. The key theme to be explored throughout the course is that of representation and art's capacity to convey a truth about our experience of reality.

     

     

     

     

     

    WATCHING LIST:

     

    u The Wind That Shakes the Barley (2006), dir. Ken Loach

     

    u Brooklyn (2015), dir. John Crowley

     

    u Breakfast on Pluto (2005), dir. Neil Jordan

     

    u Some Mother's Son (1996), dir. Terry George

     

    u '71 (2014), dir. Yann Demange

     

    u Five Minutes of Heaven (2009), dir. Oliver Hirschbiegel

     

    u Philomena (2013), dir. Stephen Frears

     

     

     

    • Dr Tomasz Gnat Module title: Cyberculture – social, cultural and economic context of the Internet.

     

    Nazwa modułu: Cyberkultura – społeczny, kulturowy i ekonomiczny kontekst Internetu.

     

    The purpose of the module is to outline and investigate the fundamental change in the way we conceptualize and experience our world, the change directly related to the emergence of global communication networks. The basic premise of this module is that the global spread of information and communication technology (ICT), is both a sign of the postmodern era and the premiss for that era of intensive worldwide interactions of people and exchanges of goods, services, information, and capital. As such, the following topics will be covered during the module: crisis of the old, emergence of the new media, economy and business ethics of new media, the cultural effects of new media, transparency, privacy and information gathering in the context of new media, Fair Use, regulation of new media and the effects of social media.

     

     

     

     

     


  • Wykład prof. Petera Swirskiego zostaje odwołany

    Informujemy, że wykład gościnny prof. Petera Swirskiego planowany na dzień 25 maja zostaje odwołany.

  • Propozycje modułów tematycznych dla obecnego II roku (studiów I stopnia) specjalności kmt i kaoj planowanych w przyszłym roku akademickim (2018/19)

     

    Moduły do wyboru 2018/2019

     

    Studia stacjonarne I stopnia

     

     

     

    PROSZĘ WYBRAĆ 1 MODUL Z OBSZARU LITERATURA/KULTURA ORAZ 1 MODUŁ Z OBSZARU MEDIA

     

    1.) 3 rok specjalność kultura-media-translacja: „LITERATURA/KULTURA” 15 godzin wykłady, 30 godzin ćwiczenia

     

    • Dr Marcin Mazurek Utopia i dystopia w literaturze, filmie i teorii -Utopia and Dystopia in Literature, Film and Theory

     

    The module’s purpose is to analyse selected examples of both literary and cinematic utopias and dystopias in view of their conceptual assumptions and – in case of utopias – their failures resulting in blurring the boundary between utopian ideals and dystopian, or anti-utopian outcomes. The texts and films under scrutiny include both classic literary representations and contemporary visions, which are all located within relevant theoretical contexts, including dystopian undertones in particular theoretical approaches.

     

     

     

    • dr hab.Eugenia Sojka

     

     

     

    (DE)CONSTRUCTING CANADIANNESS. REVISITING MYTHOLOGIES OF CANADA

     

     

     

    (DE)KONSTRUOWANIE KANADYJSKOŚCI. PONOWNE ODCZYTANIE MITOLOGII KANADY

     

     

     

    This interdisciplinary course is designed to explore literary and cultural texts ( including film and visual arts) of several minority groups in Canada with reference to changing mythologies of Canadianness. It focuses on dominant Canadian narratives of nationhood and their distinctiveness within the North American model.

     

     

     

    • dr hab. Eugenia Sojka

     

    CANADIAN INTERCULTURAL DRAMA, THEATRE AND PERFORMANCE  

     

    The course is designed to acquaint students with Canadian diasporic and Indigenous intercultural drama, theatre and performance and provide critical tools for the analysis of various types of interculturality. Texts selected for discussion will be grouped into the following categories: re-appropriation of canonical works, celebration of transculturality, dialogue of aesthetic traditions and performing intercultural memory

     

     

     

             2.) 3 rok specjalność kultura-media-translacja: „ MEDIA” 15 godzin wykłady, 30 godzin ćwiczenia

     

    • THE REVIVAL OF THE WEIRD IN CONTEMPORARY CULTURE

     

    Dr Karolina Lebek

     

     

     

    The course is devoted to the exploration of the phenomenon of the aesthetic form of the weird in contemporary literature, film, and TV of the fantastic and speculative inclination. Defined by the presence of things strange, unknown, disturbing and suggestive of monstrosity, the weird is a flexible and liquid form, accommodating instances of cosmic horror, the supernatural, the grotesque and the absurd. Therefore, the course maps the weird in the context of such genres and modes as horror, fantasy, the gothic and science fiction, tracing its roots to the late 19th century/ early 20th century in the short stories of such writers as Algernon Blackwood, M.P. Shiel, Ambrose Bierce, Robert Chambers, Arthur Machen, William Hope Hodgeson and, most significantly, H.P. Lovecraft. Moving on to contemporary culture, the course discusses selected weird works and theories of the weird offered by, among others, Thomas Ligotti, Jeff VanderMeer, China Mieville Michael Cisco, Kathe Koja, Caitlin Kiernan, Kelly Link as well as films, art and TV series inspired by their work. The assigned texts for the course will consist mostly of short stories and visual materials.

     

     

     

    • dr hab. Eugenia Sojka

     

     

     

    DECOLONIZING NORTH AMERICAN FILMMAKING: INDIGENOUS CINEMATIC SELF-REPRESENTATION IN CANADA

     

     

     

    The course is devoted to the postcolonial / decolonial analysis of cinematic discourses by selected Canadian filmmakers of Indigenous background. The first part of the course focuses on the examination of various types of colonial mis/representation of Aboriginal people in the mainstream American photography and film, and then it proceeds to the exploration of self-representation by Indigenous artists in films which aim at decolonizing the traditional ethnographic, Hollywood and other problematic representations of American Aboriginal people.

     

    • Course Title: THEORY OF GAMES, PLAY, AND CARNIVAL/ Teoria gier, zabawy i karnawału

     

    Instructor: mgr Ewa Wylężek

     

    Class Description: The module introduces the fundamental concepts of game and play theory as well as an examination of the concept of carnival and the relations between them. Students will learn about the differences and similarities between the phenomena as well as study the characteristics and tools games, play, and carnival include and use. The course will consider the social and cultural significance of ludicity and the emergence of homo ludens. Philosophical theories of play and games should be examined with special attention drawn to aspects such as, fate/chance, power, identity, carnivalesque, magic circle, alea, agon, mimicry, vertigo.

     

    The seminar portion of this course will build upon the ideas explored in lecture, albeit with an eye towards case studies inspired by computer games and other texts of culture. The written assignment will have as its aim an analysis of a chosen cultural phenomenon.

     

    • Course Title: A Survey of North American Cinema / Kino Pólnocnoamerykańskie

     

    Instructor: mgr Ewa Wylężek

     

     

     

    Class Description: This two-part course will address the development of North American cinema, specifically by positioning it as a unique site of expression, debate, inclusion/exclusion, consensus, and, of course, cultural negotiation.

     

     

     

    The lecture portion of this course will investigate North America’s cinematic history, specifically by relating it to notions of power, technology, identity, and nationhood. We will subsequently ponder how one hundred and twenty years of North American cinema, in the sense of production, transmission, and consumption, has played a unique role in the continuous formation, reception, and negotiation of those notions. Specific cinematic examples that we will contextually investigate include The Kid, The Phantom of the Opera, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Double Indemnity, On The Waterfront, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Graduate, Jaws, Back to the Future, Boyz n the Hood, American Beauty, and WALL-E. By the conclusion of this course students ought to be able to demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of North American culture via the lens of cinema. Students should equally be able to identify and expound upon the social movements, technological developments, governmental influence, and capitalist motivations that have played a role in establishing this cinematic history.

     

     

     

    The seminar portion of this course will build upon the ideas explored in lecture, albeit with an eye towards cinematic adaptions of classic North American novels and plays. Our seminar time will be dedicated to theories of adaptation, the major differences between cinema and literary texts, strategies for altering literary texts for the cinematic medium, factors that influence the adaptation process, and why specific texts have been optioned for cinematic development.

     

     

     

     

     

    • Dr hab. Leszek Drong Irish Film and Literature

     

    (20th century)

     

     

     

    This course offering interweaves films and readings in order to vary the range of cutural texts concerned with Irish history and social issues which have informed and inspired Irish artists. The key theme to be explored throughout the course is that of representation and art's capacity to convey a truth about our experience of reality.

     

     

     

     

     

    WATCHING LIST:

     

    u The Wind That Shakes the Barley (2006), dir. Ken Loach

     

    u Brooklyn (2015), dir. John Crowley

     

    u Breakfast on Pluto (2005), dir. Neil Jordan

     

    u Some Mother's Son (1996), dir. Terry George

     

    u '71 (2014), dir. Yann Demange

     

    u Five Minutes of Heaven (2009), dir. Oliver Hirschbiegel

     

    u Philomena (2013), dir. Stephen Frears

     

     

     

    • Dr Tomasz Gnat Module title: Cyberculture – social, cultural and economic context of the Internet.

     

    Nazwa modułu: Cyberkultura – społeczny, kulturowy i ekonomiczny kontekst Internetu.

     

    The purpose of the module is to outline and investigate the fundamental change in the way we conceptualize and experience our world, the change directly related to the emergence of global communication networks. The basic premise of this module is that the global spread of information and communication technology (ICT), is both a sign of the postmodern era and the premiss for that era of intensive worldwide interactions of people and exchanges of goods, services, information, and capital. As such, the following topics will be covered during the module: crisis of the old, emergence of the new media, economy and business ethics of new media, the cultural effects of new media, transparency, privacy and information gathering in the context of new media, Fair Use, regulation of new media and the effects of social media.

     

     

     

     

     

  • Guest Lecture by Prof. dr. Thomas Pfau, Duke Divinity School, USA

    We are happy to announce a guest Lecture by Prof. dr. Thomas Pfau, Alice Mary Baldwin Professor of English Professor of German, Member of Duke Divinity School Faculty. The lecture, entitled "Forms of Attention in G. M. Hopkins, P.Cezanne, and Sebastiao Salgado", will be given on 29 May 2018, Tuesday in Lecture hall,  1.49 at 11:30 a.m. Students and faculty members are kindly invited to attend.

  • Professor Peter Swirski's visit at IECL

    It is with great pleasure that we announce two lectures by Professor Peter Swirski who will visit our institution from 22 May to 02 June this year.

    “Oral Traditions in Literature and Society: Empirical Approaches to Literary Paleoanthropology” will take place on May 24th at 2pm in SRW (The School of Modern Languages  University of Silesia, Gen.S. Grota-Roweckiego 5 in Sosnowiec).
    "That’s Entartainment! Nobrow Art as Beachbooks for Intellectuals” will take place on 25th May 2018 at 2pm in SRW (The School of Modern Languages  University of Silesia, Gen.S. Grota-Roweckiego 5 in Sosnowiec).

    On May 30th at 2pm, Professor Swirski will also be a guest speaker at a meeting on Stanisław Lem and his fiction organized bythe Ireneusz Opacki Institute of Polish Literature, in Katowice (SRW, Plac Sejmu Ślaskiego, Katowice).

    The lectures and meetings are open to the public.

    Peter Swirski is a Canadian scholar and writer, listed in the Canadian Who’s Who. He is Amazon and Alibris multiple #1 Bestseller in American History and Criticism, Popular Culture Criticism, and Canadian Literary Criticism, and author of seventeen award-winning books. He has appeared on the BBC Forum with audience of more than 200 million and, alongside Noam Chomsky, at the UNE Center for Global Humanities.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Swirski

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVgosAI8EmA&list=PLiix-KixPVrZfb8s0UwiypDx8MmnOj1Mb

  • Guest Lecture and workshops by dr. Mark Jackson (Newcastle University), 21 & 22 May, 2018

    Between May 21st, 2018, and May 23rd, 2018, IECL will host Dr. Mark Jackson from Newcastle University, UK. Dr. Mark Jackson is Senior Lecturer in Archaeology and his research is based mostly on the Eastern Mediterranean with a focus on Turkey, Greece and Cyprus. He is also Manager of the Gertrude Bell Photographic Archive, and has recently assisted the directors Zeva Oelbaum and Sabine Krayenbuehl, in the making of their Letters from Baghdad (2016), a documentary about Gertrude Bell. During his visit, Dr. Jackson will give an open lecture on Monday, May 20, 15:00 (room 1.49) – “Gertrude Bell, the Newcastle Archive and the World War I Centenary, and will conduct a workshop for MA students (Tuesday, May 21, 11:30, room 2.8) – “Gertrude Bell: from traveller to archaeologist.”

  • Open Lecture on Irish Drama by Professor Michael McAteer (Monday, May 21 at 11:30)

    It is our pleasure to invite both students and faculty to an open lecture by Professor Michael McAteer from Pázmány Péter Catholic University in Budapest. The lecture will be held in room 0.51 on Monday, May 21, at 11:30. Professor Michael McAteer will speak on “Sacrifice as Excess in Irish Drama: Patrick Pearse and W.B. Yeats”. He has published two monographs, Standish O’Grady, AE, Yeats (Irish Academic Press, 2002) and Yeats and European Drama (Cambridge University Press, 2010), in addition to a wide range of book chapters and journal essays. He is also Director of the Budapest Centre for Irish Studies.

  • Dr Lieke Stelling will visit IECL in May

    Between 8th and 11th of May the Institute of English and Cultures and Literatures will host Dr Lieke Stelling from the University of Utrecht (the Netherlands) whose research focuses on the culture of Early Modern England and the period of reformation. Dr Stelling will give two open guest lectures at the Institute:

    • on May 9th at 9.45 (room 0.3) she will give a lecture entitled "‘Thy very essence is mutability’: Representations of Religious Conversion on the Early Modern English Stage".
    • On May 10th at 13.15 (room 0.51) the lecture will be titled "Faith in Jest: Towards an Understanding of Humour and Religion in English Reformation Literature".

    More details on the attached posters.

  • Professor Corey McCall will visit IECL in May

    We are happy to announce that Professor Corey McCall will be our guest of on May 17. During his visit he will give two lectures:

    - 11:30 a.m., room: 0.51: "Baldwin Boldly (or the Colorful America)"
    - 1:15 p.m., room: 0.51: "Imperious Curiosity (with a Pinch of Dasein)" 
    Corey McCall is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Elmira College in Upstate New York. He earned his PhD from Southern Illinois University in 2005 with a dissertation on the philosophical stakes of Martin Heidegger’s phenomenological account of curiosity. His research examines various intersections between philosophy and literature in both European and American contexts. He is co-editor of Melville Among the Philosophers (Lexington Books, 2017) and Benjamin, Adorno, and the Experience of Literature (Routledge, 2018)as well as numerous articles and scholarly presentations on figures such as Michel Foucault, Walter Benjamin, Frantz Fanon, and Stanley Cavell. His current work explores the philosophical significance of James Baldwin’s work and various connections between prophecy, myth, literature, and philosophy in American, European, and Caribbean intellectual traditions.

IECL Conferences

  • Emotions: The Engines of History
    Emotions: The Engines of History

    The Institute of English Cultures and Literatures and H/Story Research Circle invite all to participate in the international conference

    EMOTIONS: THE ENGINES OF HISTORY

    https://enginesofhistory.wordpress.com

    Sosnowiec, Poland, Nov. 23rd-24th 2018

    CALL FOR PAPERS

    The etymology of the word “emotion,” whose first use dates back to the sixteenth century, betrays the multiplicity of its meanings. Derived from the Middle French emouvoir (to stir up), it traces its origins back to the Latin emovēre (to remove or displace), which in turn comes from the Latin movēre (to move). The notion of movement, then, or a change of state, has always accompanied the way people conceptualise emotions. History is, similarly, a record of movement, fluidity, and volatility, and this approach is increasingly being extended to the study of humanity’s past, with emotion studies bringing increased sensitivity to historical, literary and cultural enquiries. Approaching emotions as “engines,” that is catalysts of past events and processes is, however, fraught with challenges. It is largely due to the fact that the roles of irrationality and emotionality as motivating elements in history and its narratives are not easy to determine and often elude scientific study due to their intimate and highly personal nature. Likewise the very thought that historical decisions affecting the lives of many might have been made under the capricious influence of somebody else’s emotional state fills us with dread. And yet, we suspect or perhaps even know that many events of both distant and not so distant past have been dictated by emotional disposition and moods of those who made them. If fear, hatred, desire, disgust, pity, envy, love and shame affect our individual choices, they might as well influence the decisions whose consequences go beyond one’s singular or communal experience. From the Ides of March, through the separation of the Church of England from Rome, to the role of the social media in the most recent presidential elections in the USA, emotions have shaped and influenced historic events giving rise to groundbreaking social and political changes.

  • Captive Minds: Norms, Normativities and the Forms of Tragic Protest in Literature and Cultural Practice

    23rd International Conference of the Institute of English Cultures and Literatures, University of Silesia in Katowice

    Captive Minds: Norms, Normativities and the Forms of Tragic Protest in Literature and Cultural Practice
    Hotel Meta Resort Vine Spa, Szczyrk, Poland
    September 20, 2018 – September 23, 2018
    www.captiveminds.pl

     Although generally resented and deemed unfavourable for individuals, societies and nations, Murti-Bing was a Mongolian philosopher who had succeeded in producing an organic means of transporting a “philosophy of life.” This Murti-Bing “philosophy of life,” which constituted the strength of the Sino-Mongolian army, was contained in pills in an extremely condensed form. A man who used these pills changed completely. He became serene and happy. The problems he had struggled with until then suddenly appeared to be superficial and unimportant. He smiled indulgently at those who continued to worry about them. Most affected were all questions pertaining to unsolvable ontological difficulties. A man who swallowed Murti-Bing pills became impervious to any metaphysical concerns. […] More and more people took the Murti-Bing cure, and their resultant calm contrasted sharply with the nervousness of their environment. […] [O]nce tormented by philosophical “insatiety,” now entered the service of the new society. Instead of writing the dissonant music of former days, they composed marches and odes. Instead of painting abstractions as before, they turned out socially useful pictures. But since they could not rid themselves completely of their former personalities, they became schizophrenics.(Czesław Miłosz, The Captive Mind)

    In a world transforming faster than ever before, a Murti-Bing pill would do wonders to those who painfully discover that their heretofore professed philosophy of life has unexpectedly become a burden: an obstacle standing in the way to “serenity and happiness.” In fact, the miraculous power of the pill is simple: whatever norms gain on momentum at a given moment of time, they immediately become one’s own. With serenity and happiness at stake, the choice not to take the pill is a choice between one’s own “insatiable,” unique self and one’s peace of mind, the tranquility of life and liberty not to judge success in life by the gauge of satisfaction. In a world transforming faster than ever, in which the Murti-Bing pills are available without prescription and advertised in all official media, the refusal to blend into the woodwork for the sake of the comfort of being “impervious to any metaphysical concerns” is nothing short of a tragic choice. Therefore, the 2018 edition of the International Conference of the Institute of English Cultures and Literatures of the University of Silesia in Katowice aims at addressing one of the most elusive, albeit simultaneously most tangible aspects of our experience of being in the world. As a foundation and a product of grand narratives, norms apply to any and every aspect of individual, communal and social life. They regulate our behaviors, determine directions in the evolution of arts and philosophical ideas, condition intra- and cross-cultural understanding, organize hierarchies. Yet – when transformed into laws – norms become appropriated by dominant discourses becoming “truths.”  Those in control of language always construe them as “universal” and, as such, “transparent”. Those once tormented by philosophical “insatiety,” sharply aware of this, face a choice: a pill-induced schizophrenia which must eventually come, or even more catastrophic consequences of the tragic protest, which are most likely to ensue. Oppressive normativity and protest have always gone hand in hand. The 2018 International Conference of the Institute of English Cultures and Literatures, in a sense, is a product of the refusal to take the Murti-Bing pill.

     

    DETAILED CALL FOR PAPERS: http://www.ocs.us.edu.pl/index.php/captiveminds/captiveminds/schedConf/cfp

    APPLICATION DEADLINE: April 10.

    CONFERENCE FEE: The conference fee amounts to 600 PLN (Polish Zloty), which is ca. 160 EURO,

    CONFERENCE WEBSITE: http://www.ocs.us.edu.pl/index.php/captiveminds/captiveminds

...all IECL Conferences

 

Recent IECL Books

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Wydział Filologiczny Uniwersytetu Śląskiego
ul. Gen. S. Grota-Roweckiego 5
41-205 Sosnowiec